Dusting Off The Guitar

More Music

I got a bit of time to upload some new songs and other ones which I have had the chance to edit. Been a while since I have had the time to do so and it feels good to revisit songs which I haven’t listened to since I recorded them.

So here they are. Ranging from original songs (and an original song / story about the Irish Famine) and a few cover songs too.

I hope you like them.

Rumours (original song about the Irish Famine)

Last Night (acoustic cover of The Strokes song)

 

I’ll Meet You There One Day (original song for Palestine)

 

There Won’t Be Many Coming Home (Roy Orbison cover)

Hello (Adele Cover)

Rust (original)

Rivers Run Clear (original)

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Creativity Sensitivity

 

Exam procrastination has drove me to record and put up a few songs that have been neglected. Here is another one…

Probably going to regret not doing more…but here’s an xray of a skull so you know my head is in the right place.

Enjoy.

Junior Chills – Dublin 1916

Junior Chills – Dublin 1916 (original)

Due to the historical significance of 2016, I wanted to write a song about the events of the Easter Rising in 1916. I have studied Irish History and British History for many, many years and tried to incorporate as much of this as possible into the song. I have written the song from four different people’s perspectives during the Easter Rising of 1916. One of these people is a reflection of someone who fought and died during the Rising, the rest are figments of my imagination.

If you can, try and listen to the lyrics and not so much the singing.

The first verse is from the perspective of a volunteer who is fighting within the GPO in Dublin during The Rising.  As the place is burning down around him he remembers the words of Padraig Pearse at the funeral of O’Donovan Rossa, at which he was present:

“the fools, the fools, the fools! – they have left us our Fenian dead, and while Ireland holds these graves, Ireland unfree shall never be at peace”

This seems to strengthen his resolve to fight for the freedom of Ireland.

The second verse is from the perspective of an older volunteer who is thinking about the British Empire and, specifically, what took place in India. I wanted to link the significance of Britain’s Empire to the Easter Rising as a lot of the military tactics which were used by the British during the Rising were perfected throughout their various wars during their empirical days. The verse ends with the beginning of World War One and the view that because Britain’s attention was focused on Germany, this was the perfect opportunity to strike and fight for Ireland’s freedom.

The final verse begins from the perspective of James Connolly, who was within the inner circle of those who organised the Easter Rising and was commandant of the Dublin Brigade during Easter 1916. The leaders of the Rising were executed for their roles but Connolly’s execution was probably the most poignant as he had been injured during the events, was tied to a chair in the courtyard and executed by a firing squad while seated.

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Junior Chills – Dublin 1916

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The verse continues from the perspective of someone who fought and survived the Easter Rising. He / She reflects on the significance of the events of Easter Week and how Ireland’s freedom is “not a question of if, but when”.

The Easter Rising was a defining moment in modern Irish History and I think that, especially as it is a centenary year, people should take a few minutes to read about the events of 1916. It is something which has been told to me on numerous occasions and one which rings true…Ireland may only be a small island but it has a massive history!!

 

D.M.