Dusting Off The Guitar

More Music

I got a bit of time to upload some new songs and other ones which I have had the chance to edit. Been a while since I have had the time to do so and it feels good to revisit songs which I haven’t listened to since I recorded them.

So here they are. Ranging from original songs (and an original song / story about the Irish Famine) and a few cover songs too.

I hope you like them.

Rumours (original song about the Irish Famine)

Last Night (acoustic cover of The Strokes song)

 

I’ll Meet You There One Day (original song for Palestine)

 

There Won’t Be Many Coming Home (Roy Orbison cover)

Hello (Adele Cover)

Rust (original)

Rivers Run Clear (original)

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Creativity Sensitivity

 

Exam procrastination has drove me to record and put up a few songs that have been neglected. Here is another one…

Probably going to regret not doing more…but here’s an xray of a skull so you know my head is in the right place.

Enjoy.

Junior Chills – For Palestine

Junior Chills – For Palestine (original)

A few weeks ago I was asked to play a song by Woody Guthrie called ‘Deportees’. I had not heard of the song never mind played it before but I tried my hand at it and, I think, it went down well. The song stuck with me as it was based on a true story so I decided to put my own lyrics to the music of another true story. The story of Palestine. Guthrie’s song was a protest song…this, I suppose, is my own protest song to the injustice and plight of the Palestinians at the hand of Israel.

The songs basis comes from a quote I read from Chairman Heilbrun of the Committee for the Re-election of General Shlomo Lahat, the mayor of Tel Aviv, in October 1983. The quote reads “We have to kill all the Palestinians unless they are resigned to live here as slaves.” This quote has, obviously, caused quite a lot of controversy especially in regards to its authenticity. I have researched into it but I could not find anything to suggest that it was not said. It is important to note that because one person said it does not ring true for everyone else.

The chorus is made up of people who have died in Palestine due to attacks from Israel. The people are:

Mohammad Abu Khadeir – 16 years old, died in July 2014

Nasser Abu Maraheel – 42 years old, died in September 2003

Mohammad Ibrahim Ar Reyati – September 2008

Bassem Hassan Hijazi – 36 years old, died August 2014

I have also tried to incorporate Arabic, the Palestinian language, into the song by including ‘ma salama’ which means ‘goodbye’. I am saying goodbye and farewell to Khadeir, Maraheel, Ar Reyati, Hijazi and the hundreds and thousands more who have died, injustly, at the hands of Israel.

I have put this song up during an important, historical time for Ireland and its connection with Palestine. What Ireland has (and still is) been subjected to by Britain, so too is Palestine experiencing by Israel. I allude in the song to bias coverage of the war which has been waged upon Palestinians and I hope that via this protest song, people may read a little more into what is happening and question the ‘news’ which is being propagated by mainstream media.

Just a quick note on the video for the song. It is a mixture of footage and still images. The footage represents hope for life in Palestine. It also marks the disparity between life as we are, maybe, used to and life which Palestinians face on a daily basis. The still images reflect the true picture of life in Palestine.

Not that I want people to like the song or messages conveyed in it, but more to appreciate the protest and awareness raising nature of it.

D.M.

Junior Chills – Dublin 1916

Junior Chills – Dublin 1916 (original)

Due to the historical significance of 2016, I wanted to write a song about the events of the Easter Rising in 1916. I have studied Irish History and British History for many, many years and tried to incorporate as much of this as possible into the song. I have written the song from four different people’s perspectives during the Easter Rising of 1916. One of these people is a reflection of someone who fought and died during the Rising, the rest are figments of my imagination.

If you can, try and listen to the lyrics and not so much the singing.

The first verse is from the perspective of a volunteer who is fighting within the GPO in Dublin during The Rising.  As the place is burning down around him he remembers the words of Padraig Pearse at the funeral of O’Donovan Rossa, at which he was present:

“the fools, the fools, the fools! – they have left us our Fenian dead, and while Ireland holds these graves, Ireland unfree shall never be at peace”

This seems to strengthen his resolve to fight for the freedom of Ireland.

The second verse is from the perspective of an older volunteer who is thinking about the British Empire and, specifically, what took place in India. I wanted to link the significance of Britain’s Empire to the Easter Rising as a lot of the military tactics which were used by the British during the Rising were perfected throughout their various wars during their empirical days. The verse ends with the beginning of World War One and the view that because Britain’s attention was focused on Germany, this was the perfect opportunity to strike and fight for Ireland’s freedom.

The final verse begins from the perspective of James Connolly, who was within the inner circle of those who organised the Easter Rising and was commandant of the Dublin Brigade during Easter 1916. The leaders of the Rising were executed for their roles but Connolly’s execution was probably the most poignant as he had been injured during the events, was tied to a chair in the courtyard and executed by a firing squad while seated.

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Junior Chills – Dublin 1916

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The verse continues from the perspective of someone who fought and survived the Easter Rising. He / She reflects on the significance of the events of Easter Week and how Ireland’s freedom is “not a question of if, but when”.

The Easter Rising was a defining moment in modern Irish History and I think that, especially as it is a centenary year, people should take a few minutes to read about the events of 1916. It is something which has been told to me on numerous occasions and one which rings true…Ireland may only be a small island but it has a massive history!!

 

D.M.